Simic Ramp – Theros Beyond Death Standard Deck Guide

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Hello reader! Thank you for reading my first article on MTG Arena Zone. My name is Jana Amari and I am a new Magic: The Gathering streamer and seasoned cosplayer based in Vancouver, Canada. Although I’ve only been playing Magic since War of the Spark in 2019, I am deeply passionate about the game, seeking to improve each day. My highest end-of-season rank on the MTGA ladder is top 100 Mythic in Throne of Eldraine Season 2. My streams focus on competitive play and learning decks in a positive, fun environment! Catch my streams 5 days a week at https://twitch.tv/JanaAmari and follow my live updates on Twitter @JanaAmariChan. Check out my past cosplays on Instagram @misslunarcrow.

Introduction

Simic is all about the use of mana acceleration to rapidly ramp into the best threats Standard can buy. Having been supplemented with additional game-changing blue and green spells in Theros: Beyond Death, the Simic Ramp archetype is stronger than ever and is definitely a major player on ladder. This guide provides an overview, sideboard guide, and gameplan for this prodigious deck to help you claw your way to Mythic and secure that Top 1200 end-of-season finish so you can compete at the next Mythic Championship Qualifier!

Deck Summary

Simic Ramp by Jana Amari - Theros Beyond Death Standard

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  • Archetype: Simic Ramp
  • Gameplan: Ramp mana to play bombs as quickly as possible to secure a swift victory!
  • Key Cards:

Notable Card Mentions:

thb-071-thassa-deep-dwelling

Card Interactions

Elementals Package

The Elementals package provides both ramp and card advantage. Introduced in Core Set 2020, Risen Reef is one of the most powerful card drawing engines in the current metagame. Resolving a Risen Reef has the potential to pull you mana ahead of the opponent, if there was one on top of the library. The card triggers for other elementals into play, which are your Leafkin Druids (a fine ramp source to begin with) and Cavalier of Thorns. More lands in play means a bigger, fatter Hydroid Krasis (especially with Castle Garenbrig) or twice the mana with Nissa, Who Shakes the World. The point of the deck is to quickly overwhelm the opponent with your mana advantage, which is what the Elementals package is best at!

Nissa, Who Shakes the World + Hydroid Krasis

Introduced in War of the Spark, Nissa, Who Shakes the World has been a key card in almost every green based deck. Nissa has a high starting loyalty at 5, making it difficult to remove her from the board through direct damage alone. Quickly ramping mana with the elementals package, Arboreal Grazer, or Growth Spiral in the early game enables you to play Nissa as early as turn 3 potentially. Nissa can then be used to pressure the opponent with her army of 3/3 vigilance haste lands, while generating truly colossal amounts of mana if she lives just one turn, enabling you to play multiple big threats the turn after. One of the best things you can do with all this mana is to use Hydroid Krasis to draw a ton of cards, gain a bunch of life and play a huge flying threat. Nissa’s mana production and all the other mana acceleration the deck has to offer can enable you to cast truly enormous Krases, potentially even for x = 14 to completely refill your hand late game!

Uro, Titans of Nature’s Wrath + Cavalier of Thorns

Introduced in Theros: Beyond Death, Uro, Titan of Nature’s Wrath is Growth Spiral and lifegain built into a colossal late-game threat. Although he’s been found to be slow and underwhelming in other decks, Uro is an amazing two-of in the Simic Ramp shell. With Cavalier of Thorns fuelling the graveyard, it’s possible to escape Uro right after the Cavalier. A 6/6 that draws a card, ramps, and gains life upon attacking? Yes, please! Uro also gives the deck great resiliency against control decks, as cards will naturally end up in the graveyard to refuel and recur him as the game goes on.

Thassa, Deep-Dwelling + Agent of Treachery

Thassa, Deep-Dwelling is a spicy new addition from Theros: Beyond Death. The combo the card provides with Agent of Treachery is usually devastating, if not completely game-winning, once assembled. Playing an Agent of Treachery to steal one target permanent (including lands!) in the main phase and then flickering it with Thassa’s ability to steal yet another permanent at the beginning of the end step is no joke! If the opponent can’t remove the Agent of Treachery off the board, you’re able to steal one additional permanent at the end of each turn. As you can easily tutor up creatures with Finale of Devastation, this combo is not hard to piece together once you have enough mana. Being able to steal your opponent’s best threat each turn results in board states that most opponents will be unable to recover from, and is just plain fun!

Finale of Devastation

Finale of Devastation is the biggest bomb of Simic Ramp. If we can’t somehow kill the opponent with Cavalier of Thorns, Hydroid Krasis or animated Nissa lands, we surely can with +12/+12 trample and haste creatures as we cast Finale of Devastation for x = 10 and tutor End-Raze Forerunners!

Finale of Devastation has major advantages over other late game cards in that it’s still useful in the early and mid game, and enables you to run only one copy of Agent of Treachery and End-Raze Forerunners, leading to fewer clunky draw. Tutoring Agent of Treachery by casting Finale of Devastation for x = 7 and stealing the opponent’s crucial permanent is sometimes enough to end games by itself. We can also tutor Thassa, Deep-Dwelling for x = 4 to start flickering cards and set up for our big Agent of Treachery turn later. Another common line is to tutor Cavalier of Thorns for x = 5 with a Risen Reef already in play to trigger Risen Reef‘s ability and put a land into play. Another common line is to cast it for x=3 to tutor Risen Reef with a Reef already in play – that’s two Reef triggers and then you can follow up with other Elementals for truly absurd card advantage/ramp.

war-160-finale-of-devastation

Sideboard Guide

Mono Black Devotion

Rating: Slightly Unfavoured

InOut
+2 Questing Beast
+2 Mystic Repeal
-1 Agent of Treachery
-1 Finale of Devastation
-2 Thassa, Deep-Dwelling

Being a very interaction-light deck, Simic Ramp has a hard time with this matchup. Mono Black Devotion decks can easily remove your Leafkin Druids to slow down your mana acceleration in the early game and have other removal for bigger threats like Nissa, Who Shakes the World and Cavalier of Thorns in the late game. One of their biggest threats is Nightmare Shepherd. With Nightmare Shepherd, Mono Black Devotion can block your Cavalier of Thorns favourably as death of their blocking creature means creating a token copy of it anyway. The burn damage with Cauldron Familiar and Witch’s Oven, coupled with Ayara, First of Locthwain can also kill you very quickly. With no interaction, it is impossible to stop the opponent from growing the board and building enough devotion to kill you with Gray Merchant of Asphodel – for that reason, it’s imperative not to play too slow a game here, as you don’t have the late game. The game plan is to put early pressure with Questing Beast (which they often cannot block favourably) and save Mystic Repeal for the Nightmare Sheperd. Ramp up to 8 or 10 mana as quickly as possible to tutor End-Raze Forerunners with Finale of Devastation as their deck cannot deal with trample damage. 

We board out the Thassa, Deep-Dwelling + Agent of Treachery combo post sideboard as the opponent is usually able to sacrifice creatures to Witch’s Oven or Ayara, First of Locthwain on the stack.

Summary

Watch out for:

Win with:

Esper Hero

Rating: Even Matchup

InOut
+2 Questing Beast
+3 Mystical Dispute
+2 Negate
-1 End-Raze Forerunners
-1 Finale of Devastation
-2 Risen Reef
-2 Leafkin Druid
-1 Arboreal Grazer

Esper Hero can go wide with 1/1 tokens from Hero of Precinct One and can play quite aggressively early, especially if they’re able to resolve more than one of their namesake card (creating two or more tokens per multicoloured spell is devastating!). Dream Trawler is a pain if you have no Cavalier of Thorns or Hydroid Krasis blockers. Prioritize playing Cavalier of Thorns on the battlefield ASAP to block the Dream Trawler; unfortunately this isn’t all that reliable a plan as Esper decks have a lot of exile removal which also prevents you from getting value from the Cavalier death trigger. Esper Hero cannot beat the card advantage gained from Hydroid Krasis, so cast Hydroid Krasis for maximum value using Castle Garenbrig and Nissa, Who Shakes the World. If the opponent is not allowing you to combo and steal permanents at each turn using Thassa, Deep-Dwelling and Agent of Treachery, remember that you can force tap their Dream Trawler for 4 mana to bide you more time to cast Finale of Devastation, or kill them in the air with Hydroid Krasis.

We board out half of the elementals package post sideboard as Esper Hero has too many spot removal spells to generate value off Risen Reef in the early game. The End-Raze Forerunners plan is also boarded out as Questing Beast and Hydroid Krasis are enough to kill the opponent.

Watch out for:

Win with:

Hydroid Krasis card advantage.

Esper Control

Rating: Extremely favoured after sideboard

InOut
+2 Questing Beast
+3 Mystical Dispute
+2 Negate
-1 End-Raze Forerunners
-1 Finale of Devastation
-1 Risen Reef
-2 Leafkin Druid
-2 Arboreal Grazer

The Esper Control matchup is naturally favoured. Early hand disruption is annoying but futile as Simic Ramp has better top decks. Often times, Esper Control finds itself running out answers as you put out threat after threat on the battlefield. Keep and eye out for Elspeth’s Nightmare when casting Cavalier of Thorns as the third act exiles your graveyard. Post-sideboard gets easier as you’re able to use Mystical Dispute on the opponent’s big 5 mana or 6 mana bombs such as Ashiok, Nightmare Muse or Dream Trawler, making them tap out and waste their turn. They cannot beat the card advantage gained from Hydroid Krasis, giving you enough time to find answers and win the match.

Like Esper Hero, we board out half of the elementals package post sideboard as Esper Control has too many spot removal spells to generate value off Risen Reef in the early game as well as wrath effects in mid to late game. The End-Raze Forerunners plan is also boarded out as Questing Beast, Hydroid Krasis, and animated Nissa lands are enough to kill the opponent.

Watch out for:

Win with:

Hydroid Krasis card advantage.

Azorius Control

Rating: Favoured after sideboard

InOut
+2 Questing Beast
+3 Mystical Dispute
+2 Negate
+2 Shifting Ceratops
-2 Arboreal Grazer
-2 Finale of Devastation
-2 Thassa, Deep-Dwelling
-1 End-Raze Forerunners
-1 Agent of Treachery
-1 Risen Reef

Game 1 is unfavoured/extremely unfavoured against Azorius Control. Mana acceleration is often slowed by Teferi, Time Raveler bouncing mana dorks back to hand. Even if mana acceleration is achieved, big threats are countered by Absorb, making it impossible to build a board. Game 1 often means just jamming threats into play and hoping the opponent runs out of answers. It is tough to build card advantage as newer Azorius Control decks run Whirlwind Denial mainboard to counter Hydroid Krasis. Post sideboard becomes a lot easier. Counter Teferi, Time Raveler on 3 mana using Mystical Dispute. It’s often a good idea to wait an extra turn to play your threats when you have Mystical Dispute, so that you can best protect them i.e. Nissa + Dispute on 6 mana. Keep Teferi off the board, as counterspells become useless against him, and he gives them the ability to play wraths at instant speed. On our side, Shifting Ceratops is an uncounterable threat that furthers the beatdown plan to victory, and can be difficult for them to remove. Overall, the key to victory against Azorius Control is to have early pressure with haste creatures and animated Nissa lands. The longer the game goes, the better it is for the Azorius Control opponent so you have to win ASAP. My plan for this matchup is basically to become a midrange beatdown deck, as a result.

Due to our transformation into a midrange beatdown deck, we do not need Finale of Devastation to close out games. We board out Arboreal Grazer as Azorius Control plays a much slower game – other cards such as Growth Spiral and the elementals package are enough to provide mana acceleration in the early game

Watch out for: 

war-221-teferi-time-raveler

The opponent’s open mana on your turn to predict which counterspells they have in hand.

Win with:

Jeskai Fires

Rating: Favoured

InOut
+3 Mystic Repeal
+2 Shifting Ceratops
+3 Mystical Dispute
-1 End-Raze Forerunners
-2 Nissa, Who Shakes the World
-2 Leafkin Druid
-1 Risen Reef
-1 Arboreal Grazer
-1 Hydroid Krasis

Simic Ramp always wants to go over the top against Jeskai Fires and this has become an easier matchup with the addition of new cards from Theros: Beyond Death post-sideboard. Cavalier of Thorns blocks or trades favourably with all their creatures, so ramping to Cavalier of Thorns as quickly as possible is best. The Thassa, Deep-Dwelling + Agent of Treachery combo is devastating for the opponent’s gameplan, with Jeskai Fires resolving 2 spells at most with Fires of Invention on their turn only. We’re always able to resolve Thassa, Deep-Dwelling and Agent Treachery successfully, as they can’t use counterspells while they have Fires out. It’s then possible to steal one of their permanents at each end-step to push our advantage. Post-sideboard, use Mystic Repeal to send Fires of Invention to the bottom of their deck. Use Mystical Dispute to counter their Teferi, Time Raveler or their blue flyers (Sphinx of Foresight/Cavalier of Gales), if they have yet to find their Fires of Invention. The path to victory is in buying enough time to cast Finale of Devastation for lethal, or stealing permanents with the Thassa, Deep-Dwelling + Agent of Treachery combo. Fires generally only has a few big threats to worry about, so Thassa’s second ability can come in handy to tap them down on their turn and buy you some extra time. 

Due to Jeskai Fires’ wrath effects like Deafening Clarion and Storm’s Wrath, Leafkin Druids and Nissa, Who Shakes the World become less effective (we don’t want to animate lands just to lose them all to a board wipe).

Watch out for: 

eld-125-fires-of-invention

The first Fires of Invention played.

Win with:

Temur Reclamation

Rating: Slightly favoured after sideboard

InOut
+3 Mystic Repeal
+2 Shifting Ceratops
+2 Questing Beast
+2 Negate
+3 Mystical Dispute
-2 Finale of Devastation
-2 Thassa, Deep-Dwelling
-1 End-Raze Forerunners
-1 Agent of Treachery
-2 Leafkin Druid
-2 Risen Reef
-1 Arboreal Grazer
-1 Hydroid Krasis

The Temur Reclamation archetype received great upgrades from Theros: Beyond Death. A notable addition is Storm’s Wrath. Storm’s Wrath sweeps our mana dorks in the early game which slows down our mana acceleration, and, if copied using Explosion, provides a considerable board reset in the late game. Gadwick, the Wizened is also a pain against our deck as he taps our Cavalier of Thorns/big Hydroid Krasis making them unable to attack. Game 1 is a rough matchup for Simic Ramp, especially if the opponent is curving perfectly into Wilderness Reclamation. Post-sideboard becomes better however: with Mystic Repeal, it’s possible to waste the opponent’s time and send their Wilderness Reclamation to the bottom of their deck for the cost of only 1 green mana. The path to victory is taking the beatdown plan by putting early pressure with Questing Beast and Shifting Ceratops. Questing Beast is an amazing 4 mana haste creature and Shifting Ceratops can’t be tapped by Gadwick or bounced back to hand with Brazen Borrower. Try to keep mana open to counter their threats with Negate and Mystical Dispute. The plan is to kill the opponent as quickly as possible as it is impossible to beat the opponent with giant Explosions once they have more than one Wilderness Reclamations on the battlefield.

Due to transforming Simic Ramp to a midrange beatdown deck post sideboard, we do not need Finale of Devastation to close out games. We also board out half the elemental package due to Storm’s Wrath

Watch out for:

Win with:

Simic Ramp (Mirror)

Rating: Favoured on the play

In (on the draw)Out (on the draw)
+3 Mystical Dispute -1 Thassa, Deep-Dwelling
-2 Uro, Titan of Nature’s Wrath

The mirror match is difficult to play. Unfortunately, the first player to cast Nissa, Who Shakes the World usually wins the game. In the opening hand, you’re looking for fast mana acceleration (Growth Spiral, multiple mana dorks) to a 5 mana spell (Nissa, Who Shakes the World preferably), so don’t be afraid to mull aggressively. On the play, you often want to cast two Nissas on the same turn to animate more lands and make more aggressive attacks. On the draw, save Mystical Dispute for Risen Reef to stop mana acceleration and try to cast Nissa before the opponent. Stalemate board states are won by the first person casting Finale of Devastation (x=10) for lethal damage or Thassa, Deep-Dwelling + Agent of Treachery combo.

We board out Uro, Titan of Nature’s Wrath in the mirror post sideboard as escaping the giant does not provide much value. Playing the mirror oftentimes results in stalemate board states so you will never be attacking with an escaped Uro. 

Watch out for:

Win with:

Aggro Decks

Rating: Extremely Unfavoured

InOut
+3 Lovestruck Beast
+2 Questing Beast
-1 Agent of Treachery
-1 End-Raze Forerunners
-2 Thassa, Deep-Dwelling
-1 Finale of Devastation

Aggro decks, especially those that play Embercleave, can get under Simic Ramp and punish lack of interaction. Make their attacks awkward by playing defensive Lovestruck Beasts or force favourable trades with Questing Beast. Cavalier of Thorns is a solid blocker, so prioritize casting this spell as soon as possible. Victory is achieved by stabilizing life total with Hydroid Krasis. However, this is easier said than done as aggro decks have cheap creatures and plenty of removal as introduced in Throne of Eldraine and Theros: Beyond Death. As red based aggro decks become more popular on the ladder, it is possible that Aether Gust may be a better card to include in the sideboard over Negate

We board in Lovestruck Beast and Questing Beast post sideboard as blockers. The Thassa, Deep-Dwelling + Agent of Treachery combo is boarded out as well as it is too slow against aggro decks. End-Raze Forerunners is not needed as we are able to beat aggro decks in the air with Hydroid Krasis. A copy of Finale of Devastation is left in the deck post sideboard to tutor Cavalier of Thorns as a blocker.

Watch out for:

Win with:

TL;DR (Conclusion)

Win with Simic Ramp by accelerating mana quickly to get to the following win-cons as fast as possible:

Sideboard guide:

OpponentInOut
Mono Black Devotion+2 Questing Beast
+2 Mystic Repeal
-1 Agent of Treachery
-1 Finale of Devastation
-2 Thassa, Deep-Dwelling
Esper Hero+2 Questing Beast
+3 Mystical Dispute
+2 Negate
-1 End-Raze Forerunners
-1 Finale of Devastation
-2 Risen Reef
-2 Leafkin Druid
-1 Arboreal Grazer
Esper Control+2 Questing Beast
+3 Mystical Dispute
+2 Negate
-1 End-Raze Forerunners
-1 Finale of Devastation
-1 Risen Reef
-2 Leafkin Druid
-2 Arboreal Grazer
Azorius Control+2 Questing Beast
+3 Mystical Dispute
+2 Negate
+2 Shifting Ceratops
-2 Arboreal Grazer
-2 Finale of Devastation
-2 Thassa, Deep-Dwelling
-1 End-Raze Forerunners
-1 Agent of Treachery
-1 Risen Reef
Jeskai Fires+3 Mystic Repeal
+2 Shifting Ceratops
+3 Mystical Dispute
-1 End-Raze Forerunners
-2 Nissa, Who Shakes the World
-2 Leafkin Druid
-1 Risen Reef
-1 Arboreal Grazer
-1 Hydroid Krasis
Temur Reclamation+3 Mystic Repeal
+2 Shifting Ceratops
+2 Questing Beast
+2 Negate
+3 Mystical Dispute
-2 Finale of Devastation
-2 Thassa, Deep-Dwelling
-1 End-Raze Forerunners
-1 Agent of Treachery
-2 Leafkin Druid
-2 Risen Reef
-1 Arboreal Grazer
-1 Hydroid Krasis
Simic Ramp (Mirror)
(on the draw)
+3 Mystical Dispute-1 Thassa, Deep-Dwelling
-2 Uro, Titan of Nature’s Wrath
Aggro+3 Lovestruck Beast
+2 Questing Beast
-1 Agent of Treachery
-1 End-Raze Forerunners
-2 Thassa, Deep-Dwelling
-1 Finale of Devastation
jana_amari

jana_amari

Jana Amari is a Magic: The Gathering streamer and cosplayer. Jana’s streams focuses on competitive, Mythic rank ladder play in a positive, fun environment. Catch her streams 5 days a week at twitch.tv/JanaAmari.

13 Responses

  1. Stefan says:

    Very nice article thank you.
    I am playing a simic ramp deck at the moment and would trade risen reef and some leafkin druids for wolfwillow haven. It cannot be removed so easily and keeps your ramping up.
    Also I am also using 2 Questing beast in main deck. You have them in most sideboards against all Metagame decks anyway so why not directly into the main deck?

    • jana_amari jana_amari says:

      I think that if you are using the Wolfwillow Havens as ramp, you need to remove the elementals package completely. I have tried both versions and although Wolfwillow is harder to interact with, the deck becomes a lot worse against aggro matchups as there are no creatures in the early game you can use as blockers (atleast Leafkin Druid/Risen Reef can block, or you can make them use resources to remove these creatures). I think Wolfwillow Haven is interesting however because the deck becomes more resilient to wrath effects, so maybe if control decks become more popular it will be a way better pick than the elementals package. The meta is still all over the place though so I evaluated Risen Reef as better.

      2 Questing Beast Main is a good point though as I am boarding them in many matchups. I was just experimenting with Thassa as the meta hasn’t really settled and I like her flicker effect even with Risen Reefs for more ramp. Perhaps she isn’t really as strong right now and we can trade her for Questing Beast for the 4 drop slot.

      Thanks for reading!

      • Stefan says:

        Haven has a nice combo with Nissa where you can untap the forest attached to it and get 3 mana back. Risen reef is so easy to remove (and people will do ire) that i find it to be a liability. It also competes with uro for 3 mana.
        This is also why i find thassa not convincing in simic ramp decks. There is only the agent really benefiting of her.
        I personally now use nylea and a shadow spear in the ramp deck.

  2. Luís Braz says:

    I’ve been a simic ramp player since Mengucci’s top 8 and I never paid attention to how questing beast could be a good sideboard option. I will definitely make a try. Strange that I researched the deck for a long time, including lists of professional players, having never seen any copy of it as sideboard option. Thanks for the article.

    • Braz Braz says:

      I also think you should review Blast Zone (land). Really good card.

    • jana_amari jana_amari says:

      The meta has changed completely with Mengucci’s top 8 finish at the last Mythic Championship and with the introduction of the new set. I think since control decks are in the meta that feature planeswalkers, the card is ok right now as it does direct damage to them. I like the fact that planeswalkers can be punished if they downtick and are removed the next turn with Questing Beast. It also gets over the 2/3 tokens made by Ashiok, Nightmare muse which people are experimenting with right now. I considered Blast Zone especially against aggro decks as you can maintain their board by destroying thei 1 or 2 drops they gum up the board with. Mengucci took Blast Zone out of his list a long time ago but perhaps the card is good again in the current metagame!

  3. ReconVs ReconVs says:

    This is an outstanding guide! I shall be using this next weekend for WPNQ. Well done!

  4. Jack says:

    I like this wonderful guide. One question: how to fight simic flash? I found this one to be totally beat down by simic flash.

    • jana_amari jana_amari says:

      Hi Jack,

      Simic Flash is slightly unfavourable especially if they are on the play. I would board like this:

      In: + 2 Negate, + 3 Mystical Dispute, + 2 Shifting Ceratops, + 3 Lovestruck Beast
      Out: – 2 Thassa, Deep Dwelling, – 2 Finale of Devastation, -1 Agent of Treachery, -1 End-Raze Forerunners, -2 Arboreal Grazer, – 2 Nissa, Who Shakes the World

      The idea is to save 1 mana for dispute to resolve Cavalier of Thorns which they can’t beat if you get it down on the battlefield ASAP. Shifting Ceratops is also very bad for them especially if they haven’t built up a board (haste the creature for early pressure). Lovestruck Beast can block lands and wolf tokens favourably and is a cheap enough threat in the early game to provide the early pressure. This matchup often leads to stale board states so beat them in the air with Hydroid Krasis. Opponent resolving a Nissa is very bad so try to counter with Negate at all cost. The spell to look out for is Aether Gust as you lose a lot of momentum especially if they Aether Gust your Shifting Ceratops. Double Nightpack Ambusher is also very bad but they are spending most of their time countering your threats so you can try to kill them for lethal before then.

      I didn’t include Simic Flash in the article since it’s kind of out of the meta game right now. i hope you find this addendum helpful.

  5. Rene Narciso says:

    Hello,

    Very good guide, it has been very useful to me, as a fan of simic ramp.

    Any chance of advice on how to fight jund sacrifice? It is not quite the same as aggro, since they sometimes take their time to set up their board.

    Thanks.

    • jana_amari jana_amari says:

      The best approach to Jund Sacrifice with this configuration is to ramp as fast as you can to cast Finale of Devastation for x = 10 as the cat + oven decks can’t deal with trample. I think you can cut 2 Arboreal Grazer for Questing Beast for early game pressure, however the Jund Sacrifice deck has a ton of removal spells so you may not be able to squeeze and attack in with Questing Beast.

      Their biggest threat is Korvold. Perhaps you can chain Thassa + Agent of Treachery combo to steal their oven + Korvold on the same turn but its hard to tell if you can ever survive for that long. Multiple ovens on the field will punish you as they will sacrifice their creature so you won’t be able to steal it. Using your Agent of Treachery to steal their oven may be good too as you can kill your own Cavalier of Thorns to make cards in the graveyard you need available to you.

      If you’re seeing a lot of this deck playing on the ladder, I suggest swapping Negate for Aether Gust in the sideboard to make tempo plays, such as gusting the Korvold or Mayhem Devil to bide more time. They play a lot of Fabled Passages so you can actually Aether Gust their creature away on the stack of them sacrificing the land so their threat gets shuffled away in their deck. Other than that I think the matchup is pretty 50/50 as, like you said they need a lot of time to get their combo pieces out.

  6. Jack says:

    thanks, Jana. I realized why I lost: it’s BO1. So I usually don’t include beast and dispute. however in BO3, it’s totally beatable after sideboarding. thanks for this detailed guide again.

  7. Oleg Oleg says:

    Hello.
    Very good deck and guide.
    How to fight Bant Ramp and Temur Adventures decks?
    Thanks

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