Standard 2022 Mono White Aggro Guide: Strike First, Strike Hard!

afr-25-monk-of-the-open-hand

“To me, this is when Magic is the most fun. It’s a time when deck building is fresh and challenging and everyone is hard at work innovating and trying to figure what cards are best and what are the best ways to use them.” – Craig Wescoe

What would it be if we wrote a column talking about White Weenie and didn’t start with a great quote from the greatest representative of White cards? For people who have been playing for some time, Craig’s name won’t be unfamiliar, but for those who are just starting out, if you are really interested in this archetype, getting familiar with Craig’s methodology will undoubtedly be of great help.

White Weenie decks are probably one of the oldest strategies in Magic history. This is due to its apparent simplicity; play cheap efficient creatures and overrun slower strategies before they get a chance to set up. This takes us to our first and most important question, what makes a creature efficient? Answering this can help us choose the best ones to fulfill our purpose.

“A measure of creature’s efficiency is the ratio between its power and its casting cost” – Brian David-Marshall

With this in mind and looking to our options, even if Standard 2022 is a small format, we have plenty of really efficient creatures in white: a lot of viable 1 mana drops, some 2 drops that can win the game really fast when unanswered, and very very good 3 drops that can seal the game right away!

When this kind of curving out with creatures is possible, White Weenie is generally a really powerful strategy. In fact, when our creature options are better than the removal options for our opponents, this can easily make White Weenie a tier 1 strategy, something that rings true in Standard 2022.

I started looking around for some lists to work with and I found 5.

  • Santi Delgado 5-2 (Insight Esports: Tier 1 Games Open) and Tom Maxwell 4-2 (Hooglandia Standard 2022 Open) have really good runs and set the foundations of this archetype for the format.

Insight Esports Tier 1 Games Open Santi Delgado - Mono White Aggro (12th place 5-2) 

Creatures (35)
3
Reidane, God of the Worthy
4
Kitesail Cleric
4
Monk of the Open Hand
4
Usher of the Fallen
3
Loyal Warhound
4
Luminarch Aspirant
4
Professor of Symbology
4
Elite Spellbinder
4
Skyclave Apparition
1
Legion Angel
Enchantments (2)
2
Sparring Regimen
Lands (23)
4
Faceless Haven
19
Snow-Covered Plains
Cards (60)
Sideboard (15)
2
Kabira Takedown
1
Reidane, God of the Worthy
1
Academic Probation
1
Environmental Sciences
2
Archon of Emeria
1
Inkling Summoning
2
Nahiri's Binding
1
Reduce to Memory
3
Legion Angel
1
Mascot Exhibition

Hooglandia Standard 2022 Open Tom Maxwell - Mono White Aggro (7th place 4-2) 

Creatures (31)
2
Reidane, God of the Worthy
4
Codespell Cleric
4
Monk of the Open Hand
4
Usher of the Fallen
4
Clarion Spirit
4
Luminarch Aspirant
4
Elite Spellbinder
4
Skyclave Apparition
1
Legion Angel
Artifacts (1)
1
Maul of the Skyclaves
Enchantments (4)
4
Paladin Class
Lands (24)
2
Cave of the Frost Dragon
4
Faceless Haven
18
Snow-Covered Plains
Cards (60)
Sideboard (15)
3
Portable Hole
1
Divine Smite
2
Bound in Gold
4
Guardian of Faith
2
Nahiri's Binding
3
Legion Angel
  • Then, a couple of days later I watched Mati Arvigo go 9-1 live with his own version:

AfterOfficeTV Monowhite (9-1) 

Planeswalkers (2)
2
Grand Master of Flowers
Creatures (30)
4
Codespell Cleric
4
Monk of the Open Hand
2
Ranger's Hawk
4
Star Pupil
4
Clarion Spirit
4
Luminarch Aspirant
4
Elite Spellbinder
4
Skyclave Apparition
Spells (4)
4
Kabira Takedown
Enchantments (4)
4
Paladin Class
Lands (20)
4
Faceless Haven
16
Snow-Covered Plains
Cards (60)

I tested this version a lot. I changed 2 Ranger's Hawk for 2 Kitesail Cleric and it worked fine, but, the one that I have most success with was the next one.

  • A list from Val, a french player that reach Mythic #333 a few days ago with his build:

Standard 2022 Mono White Aggro - Val MAFR #333 

Creatures (32)
3
Reidane, God of the Worthy
4
Codespell Cleric
4
Monk of the Open Hand
4
Usher of the Fallen
4
Clarion Spirit
4
Luminarch Aspirant
4
Elite Spellbinder
4
Skyclave Apparition
1
Legion Angel
Spells (2)
2
Kabira Takedown
Artifacts (2)
2
Portable Hole
Enchantments (2)
2
Paladin Class
Lands (22)
4
Faceless Haven
18
Snow-Covered Plains
Cards (60)
Sideboard (3)
3
Legion Angel

After a 8-2 testing run with this list, I was pretty sure that the numbers and balance between creatures and non-creatures spells in it were close to optimal.

  • The next list is just basically the same as Val, but with a change that is clearly aiming for closing the game faster:

Martin Juza’s Changes compared to Val’s

In

+2 Maul of the Skyclaves
+1 Portable Hole

Out

-3 Reidane, God of the Worthy

Martin went 6-0 during his Mono White video. He started with 3 Maul of the Skyclaves but, after realizing the power of Portable Hole in the format against other aggro strategies, he put in another copy instead of the 3rd Maul.

The Maul is great when we’re trying to close the game out quickly, but on the other hand, Reidane is great when we’re trying to tax out the opponent’s expensive Wrath effects (board wipes), something that is more important in my opinion.

Before anything else, we have to answer one question, which list is the best?

It’s hard to tell as each one has its own pros and cons. However, after all my tests and research about the archetype, my 8-2 run with Val’s list makes me think that is the best prepared to face the current metagame.

Adapting that list so that it would be functional for both BO1 and BO3 makes me end with something like this:

Standard 2022 White Weenie Version 2 by Bohe 

Creatures (32)
3
Reidane, God of the Worthy
4
Codespell Cleric
4
Monk of the Open Hand
4
Usher of the Fallen
4
Clarion Spirit
4
Luminarch Aspirant
4
Elite Spellbinder
4
Skyclave Apparition
1
Legion Angel
Spells (2)
2
Kabira Takedown
Enchantments (4)
2
Paladin Class
2
Sparring Regimen
Lands (22)
4
Faceless Haven
18
Snow-Covered Plains
Cards (60)
Sideboard (15)
4
Portable Hole
1
Academic Probation
1
Divine Smite
1
Environmental Sciences
3
Guardian of Faith
1
Reduce to Memory
3
Legion Angel
1
Mascot Exhibition

Explaining the Changes

In

+2 Sparring Regimen

Out

-2 Portable Hole

After all those amazing lists, why should I do something different? The reason for my changes is clear. For those who are familiar with my Rakdos Midrange column, we discussed something about not having dead cards, a really important matter when we have a BO1 ladder for this format (Power Word Kill in Mardu’s case).

Having Portable Hole in the main deck is amazing when we face Mono Green, the mirror match, or other aggressive strategies. Even Martin Juza ended with 3, but when we are paired against Izzet Dragons or Dimir Control (two forces to be reckoned with in Standard 2022) most of the time we have an unplayable card in hand which is a huge liability if we’re trying not to fall behind.

With that, the inclusion of Sparring Regimen was amazing! Having access to the “Lesson board” in BO1 is something that most of the time is going to give us the upper hand against other decks that don’t have that capability, but most importantly, it’s a card that is functional in every matchup. Plus, In BO1 it is extremely rare that someone has a card that destroys an enchantment.

I tested this list on my stream and had a pretty smooth run from D3 to Mythic, with a rough 14-2 record on ladder.

Card Choices

Reidane, God of the Worthy Art by Jason Rainville
Reidane, God of the Worthy Art by Jason Rainville

One of the foundations of White Weenie is curving out with creatures. Since this is so important, I believe that that you need a minimum of 10 one drops.

Monk of the Open Hand and Usher of the Fallen are the creatures we want to play on the first turn of the game. Hitting with a 3/3 Monk is not rare if we play a Codespell Cleric on turn 2 + any other 1 drop. On the other hand, Usher is amazing when we are missing an on curve two drop because it lets us put another body using its Boast ability. Having said this, play Monk first if you have a good turn 2 play, but go for Usher if you don’t have a follow up.

Paladin Class is a good card, but the more I play with it, the more I think it’s not meant to be in this deck Anthem effects (+1/+1 all our team) are a core part of White Weenie strategies, but we are used to 2 or 3 mana cards like Honor of the Pure, Glorious Anthem, or Benalish Marshal.

Don’t get me wrong, I like the card. Having a mana sink for a turn without a creature play is good, the tax effect makes removal less efficient, but paying 4 total mana for an Anthem is something that White Weenie is not aiming to do.

The main reason for playing it here is the fact that we play 8 cards that have effects when we play 2 cards per turn (Monk and Codespell), so having two copies of this enchantment helps our ability to double spell while also providing a mana sink for later (we discuss later the possibility of using these as flex spots).

Clarion Spirit and Luminarch Aspirant are two amazing cards that could steal the game incredibly fast if they go unanswered. The capability of swarming the board quickly is incredibly good no matter the matchup. It lets us exert pressure against slower decks without committing too many resources and against other aggro strategies it lets us block the bigger threats or take the game by attacking inthe air. Luminarch Aspirant consistently overperforms, no matter the deck it’s in. It’s flexible, can let us attack or block better, and is one of our better creatures without a doubt.

Our three drops have mostly one reason, prevent or delay any wrath effect. Paulo Elite Spellbinder and Reidane, God of the Worthy are here for that sole purpose. There are A LOT of wrath effects now: Crippling Fear, Shadows' Verdict and Blood on the Snow are lurking around in almost every slower black based deck, however, the existence of these two creatures not only enable us to play against it, but can even make these matchups extremely easy with the right draws.

Skyclave Apparition on the other hand is another white creature present in almost every white creature based deck, and it’s not hard to figure out why. The great difference between it and any other kind of Oblivion Ring removal spell is that you don’t give back the card you take which is generally extremely relevant. Aim for a pesky blocker or something that delays your plans. 

I have already explained a little why I decided to include Sparring Regimen. During my testing, this enchantment proved that it’s really strong most of the time. Going for Environmental Sciences helps us reach 4 mana which is important for playing Legion Angel, leveling up Paladin Class, and helps us get enough mana to double spell on a turn for Clarion Spirit, Monk, or Codespell.

It enables us to find removal for problematic permanents with Reduce to Memory.

Academic Probation is really good for avoiding wraths for one turn, enough time for closing games, and it removes blockers too! Furthermore, it costs two which is relevant for the two spells per turn mechanic.

Finally Mascot Exhibition lets us do something powerful when the games last longer than we expect to.

Legion Angel is incredibly good! Generally I don’t like to play 3+ mana creatures that could die against Frost Bite, but, when this calls all her sisters from the sideboard, most of the time it’s enough pressure to close oug hard games really quickly. I always refer to this card like a really big Squadron Hawk. Almost every deck opted to play those little hawks when they were around, so imagining them as a bigger version usually makes me happy to play them when I have the opportunity.

Our only main deck removal (besides Skyclave Apparition) is Kabira Takedown. I tried versions with 4 and versions with 2 and playing 4 Takedown and 4 Faceless Haven didn’t really work as this deck can’t handle two tap/colorless lands in the first two turns. Putting that aside, this has still performed really well in general as we can flood the board quick enough to make this a potent removal spell as early as turn 3.

Faceless Haven is in my opinion the best card in Standard 2022 so being able to play it is always a huge bonus. The best home for it is a mono colored deck, so playing it here is a must. Yes, I have to mulligan some hands when I have two on the opening hand because playing with two white sources is mandatory most of the time, but besides that isolated situation, this card is great.

Flex Spots

Star Pupil Art by Howard Lyon
Star Pupil Art by Howard Lyon

If you feel Paladin Class and Sparring Regiment could be replaced, there are some really good options.

Kitesail Cleric and Star Pupil are two options to play instead of the Paladin Class. They obviously have different functions as Kitesail Cleric is great for disabling two blockers on turn 4+ or for having an evasive one drop. Star Pupil on the other hand, is good because it makes our opponent have a hard time deciding where to use their removal.

They have to kill other creatures trying to avoid the value of the +1/+1 counter, something that enables us to use Luminarch Aspirant and Codespell Cleric to make him bigger, or they kill him right away, something that doesn’t bother us too much. 10 one drops (without counting Codespell Cleric) are mandatory, so this is the more important reason to suggest other one mana spells if Paladin Class are going to be cut.

Maul of the Skyclaves is a really good card and its inclusion in this deck seems obvious, bu, in my opinion, it’s not what we want in White Weenie. I put it here as an option because it’s not bad to play a pair. It helps us to speed up the clock, grants evasion, and gives us another good turn 3 play if we don’t have our other options.

However, most of the time we prefer to play any other of our three drops first over the Maul. My reasoning is that most of our creatures are small which lowers the impact of the Maul and generally you want to play a Spellbinder or Reidane first to help protect the equipped creature. Again, it’s not bad to play two copies if you want or feel comfortable with it.

Icingdeath, Frost Tyrant is a solid creature from the new set. Like I said on my stream, I don’t like when we play 3+ mana value creatures with 3- toughness because Frost Bite is around, but if the creature gives us something even when bolted, then it gets my attention. Just like Legion Angel brings us her sisters, Icingdeath gives us a beautiful sword to work with, and if Icedeath sticks, a 4 power flying vigilance body is really good!

Another option I tried is Grandmaster of Flowers, something I played with Mati’s version. It helped me to fight against 2 or 3 bigger blockers, and the fact that it could give us gas finding Monks is something that is really good for keeping the two cards per turn engine working. Don’t forget it can recover Monks from the graveyard too.

Cave of the Frost Dragon came to my mind when I tried the versions with 4 Kabira Takedown / Kabira Plateau and 4 Faceless Haven. Like I said before, this deck can’t handle two colorless/tap lands in the first two turns. Having a white source that can attack later is amazing, but the only downside of Cave is the cost for making it a creature. Faceless Haven just needs 3 mana while Cave needs 5. Despite this, playing a version with 2 Kabira and Cave instead of Faceless Haven is reasonable.

Notable Exclusions

Professor of Symbology Art by Jason Rainville
Professor of Symbology Art by Jason Rainville

Professor of Symbology is great on BO1. Having access to lessons gives us the upper hand in a lot of games, but, even if it has 2 power, 1 toughness is problematic in this kind of aggressive strategy.

Trading efficiently is really important since combat matters a lot, and the fact that it could die to the ability of Shambling Ghast or Fireblade Charger that blocks another one of our creatures, or being blocked by a Pest make this card fall behind compared to other two drops. This card is great if you’re using it defensively, but that’s clearly not what our deck is trying to do.

Loyal Warhound reminds me of one of the best creatures in White Weenie history, Knight of the Orchid. However, when we are playing BO1, I have to think twice about it. If we are on the draw this dog is amazing, but if we are on the play, most of the time it’s going to stick in our hand waiting for the right time to play it. It could help us when we miss a land drop, but if that happens, a 3/1 body is not going to be that great anyway.

Another reason for avoiding this card (and Professor of Symbology too), is the fact that our best plays on turn two are: 1.- Two one drops that synergize with our two spells per turn core or 2.- A solid two drop that is good in every situation. Circumstantial cards like these two just don’t cut it. Plus, the 1 toughness is problematic for the same reasons as Professor of Symbology. If we are aiming for a full BO3 list, I would probably make some changes to play this card without a doubt.

Sideboard Guide

afr-362-guardian-of-faith
Guardian of Faith Art by Brian Valeza

If you are going to take this archetype to a tournament environment and want to be ready for BO3 matches, this is your section.

There are a lot of really interesting tournaments around using this format, and knowing how to sideboard against the Tier 1 opposition is fundamental if we want to achieve a good run.

IZZET DRAGONS

INOUT
+3 Guardian of Faith-2 Skyclave Apparition
-1 Reidane, God of the Worthy

Even if Izzet doesn’t tend to play any kind of sweepers, Guardian of Faith has one ability that makes it incredible against this match: Flash.Izzet has a lot of instant speed interaction so having access to a card that can play the same game is really strong! Saving even one creature from a removal and putting a 3 power vigilance body on the board could turn the tide to our favor.

We take out 2 Skyclave Apparition because it only has one possible target in Galazeth Prismari, which is reason enough for keeping a pair of them. Reidane, God of the Worthy is a good card here, but since Izzet doesn’t play wrath effects, two is a good number to go with.

Izzet players are getting best prepared to face aggro strategies that swarm the board and they tend to prefer cheap spot removal, but they could run some board wipes as well. Knowing that it’s possible that they play Battle of Frost and Fire or Cinderclasm is key, and that’s when the main ability of Guardian of Faith shines the most!

DIMIR CONTROL

INOUT
+3 Guardian of Faith-4 Skyclave Apparition
+1 Divine Smite

Guardian of Faith comes onto the board for two reasons. First is the aforementioned ability of Flash, incredibly relevant when we are playing against blue based decks. Second, which in this case more important, is the fact that it could save our team for just three mana. Black midrange/control decks now are playing an absurd amount of wrath effects main board. They mostly go with 2 Crippling Fear, 2 Shadows' Verdict, and 2 Blood on the Snow, so having a way to play around this is extremely important. Don’t forget that phasing out a token won’t make it disappear!

Divine Smite is another great card for sideboard proposes. Getting rid of planeswalkers like Professor Onyx (or Lolth, Spider Queen if used) is great. The fact that this card exiles them is incredibly relevant because of the existence of Blood on the Snow. This sorcery could eliminate all our creatures and then return a creature or planeswalker from our opponent’s graveyard, something that will generally win them the game.

So, exiling those with Divine Smite is great. The fact that we have access to the lesson board and Reduce to Memory is the reason that this card is played as a one off, but is possible to have a pair of Smites in the sideboard if you prefer (playing two Reduce changing one of the other lessons is possible too).

MONO GREEN AGGRO

On the Play

INOUT
+4 Portable Hole-2 Paladin Class
-2 Elite Spellbinder

On the Draw

INOUT
+4 Portable Hole-2 Paladin Class
-2 Sparring Regimen

Portable Hole is amazing here (and against any other aggro strategy too). It lets us remove almost everything and it costs just one mana, one of the reasons we take out Paladin Class (swap one mana card for one mana card). More importantly, Paladin Class goes out because Mono Green plays almost exclusively creatures, besides Snakeskin Veil and /or Blizzard Brawl, so the tax effect is almost irrelevant. Even if the global +1/+1 is good here, we prefer to be proactive and playing anything that impacts the board immediately is better than playing Paladin Class.

Now, when we are on the play, we keep Sparring Regimen because we can play it on turn 3 and attack most of the time without consequences. When we are on the draw, playing this on turn 3 when our opponent is going to have more creatures than us is incredibly awkward. On the play we are going to keep this card take out 2 Elite Spellbinder because having just 1 toughness is really bad in this matchup. Even if we can delay a Esika's Chariot, or win attacking by air, the best use for Elite Spellbinder is when we are delaying removal.

The other possible option is to take out Reidane, God of the Worthy, but it is better in this matchup than Spellbinder. On the play, delaying all Snow-Covered Forest by making them come into play tapped is incredibly powerful and it makes our opponent stumble really hard from time to time. Furthermore, using it as Valkmira could get you more games than you might think.

Tips and Tricks

Codespell Cleric Art by Manuel Castañón
Codespell Cleric Art by Manuel Castañón

If you have a Codespell Cleric and a Monk of the Open Hand but no 2nd turn play, you can have a passive turn 1 (maybe using the chance to play a tapped Kabira Plateau), and then play both on turn 2 for making a pair of 2/2 or a 3/3 and a 1/1 is a good play.

When you are deciding which one is the best turn one play, have this in mind:

  • Monk of the Open Hand is the default best turn 1.
  • Usher of the Fallen is our play if we don’t have a turn two play, because we can use the 2nd turn for making a token and use our mana efficiently.
  • Paladin Class is good as first turn play when we have a solid 2nd turn play like Luminarch Aspirant or Clarion Spirit. This has better results against decks with spot removal because we aim to take advantage of the tax effect. Saving the other one mana cards for future turns could give us powerful play if used properly.
  • Codespell Cleric is your last option for a turn 1 play, but is acceptable if you can curve out.

Clarion Spirit and Luinarch Aspirant are lightning rods. Your opponents are going to try to take these couple of creatures out asap so evaluate the situation and decide which one is going to serve better for your purposes.

Luminarch Aspirant can put a counter on Faceless Haven. I won some games because of this.

Playing Elite Spellbinder or Reidane, God of the Worthy on turn 3 or 4 is mandatory against possible sweepers. Time to time we could have explosive turn 3 plays, but even in our best scenario we can’t kill our opponents in that spot. Playing all our cards and exposing them to a wrath effect is a game deciding choice. If we are on the play and we can kill our opponent on turn 4, go for it, but if it’s not the case, go for Elite Spellbinder or Reidane.

Have in mind all the possible wrath effects: Battle of Frost and Fire, Crippling Fear, Shadows' Verdict, Blood on the Snow, Cinderclasm, and Doomskar are the most common ones you are going to face in competitive games.

Sparring Regimen UNTAPS the attacking creature we are targeting.

Playing Reidane, God of the Worthy as Valkmira, Protector’s Shield has won many games for me against Mono Green, Gruul, Mono White and many other aggressive strategies. Furthermore, it turns off Cinderclasm which is great! Don’t doubt playing the God as a Shield if you think it is worthy.

Playing Sparring Regimen could set up a two spell play on turn 4 if we go for Environmental Sciences or Academic Probation.

Play calmly. Sequencing your spells properly is key to achieving victory in any Magic game, but is especially true playing White Weenie or other aggro strategies. One simple one mana spell played in a different moment could be the difference between winning and losing. I lost some games leaving my opponent on 1 life and just because of that, I know that if I played my cards in a different order I could have won.

Final Notes

“White Weenie decks are simple in nature, but can be complex in execution.” – Eric Froehlich

Just like I said in the last tip, playing aggro well could be as challenging as any other deck. Even Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa (Elite Spellbinder himself) has a really good pair of videos on his YouTube channel talking about this (100% recommended).

Allowing us to explore the various archetypes leads us to become more complete Magic players. I’m not saying that we have to play “less powerful” strategies just to grow as players; for some people White Weenie could look like a pile of “weak cards”, but White Weenie IS NOT a weak archetype when we have the right cards for it. For Standard 2022 in particular, we have plenty of good tools to make it work!

Some of the oldest foundations of competitive Magic is White Weenie. Let me try to prove this:

  • 96’ World Champion Tom Chanpheng
  • 98’ US champion Matt Linde.
  • 99’ US champion Kyle Rose. 
  • 2000 Kai Budde’s Rebels on PT Chicago.
  • Kai Budde’s and Paul Rietzl’s top 8 decks from PT Amsterdam 2010 (designed by Gabriel Nassif).
  • A Craig Wescoe life of MTG success playing White.

So, what else could I say?, If we are living in the right moment when we have good cards to play it, let’s do it!

Let me finish with another Craig’s Wescoe quote:

“Even if we got the idea from someone else, it becomes our own when we play it. Every idea comes from somewhere. It becomes our own when we find it and make those handful of changes to personalize it. We add our own signature style to someone else’s work or we build up our own creation from scratch. Either way, the deck we play tells a story about ourselves. Being different should be embraced and encouraged.”

Personally, I think this deck is great and can compete with the Big Three (Izzet, Dimir and Mono Green) and any other rogue archetypes. Have a great time playing and crushing the ladder or your next tournament with it!

Bohe

A full time MTG content creator. Started playing Magic in 99’ with the release of Urza’s Destiny, 3 times Grand Prix attendant (1 as a player ending #78 and 2 as a judge). Mexican, lover of coffee, Korean culture, languages and ex-LoL coach. Follow me on Instagram, Twitch, or Twitter.

23 Responses

  1. Richard says:

    Just a question,
    why do you have 3 Legion Angels in side with none in main deck ?
    As you don’t even side any in.

  2. nanojaz says:

    I played the Val’s version of this deck from Plat2 to Mythic with 76% Winrate.
    The Reidanes are very useful in a lot of situations because many decks plays “snow” in the meta.
    My last interrogation is about the presence of the 2 “Paladin class”. I will replace them by “Professor of symbology” despite what is written in the article. Access to lesson is important and having 2 more creatures may not be bad.

    PS : this article is great! Thanks a lot and congratulations to Bohe.

    • Bohe says:

      The Val version is amazing! The Portable Holes works incredible well against Mono Green, Goblins, Mirror Matches, etc. The Paladin Class it’s in fact a flexible spot, so, using other cards there it’s 0K. Even if I’m not a big fan of Professor of Symbology in White Weenie (because 1 thoughtness), have access to the lesson board is incredible useful.

      2 Symbology Proffesor + 2 Sparrin Regimen could give you a lot of adventages in BO1 against decks without lessons. 💪🏻

  3. 5dollarmtg says:

    White weenies is for real right now. I went from Diamond 4 to mythic the last few days with an 81% winrate. For BO1, I recommend starting with Val’s list from the article. If you find yourself running into sweepers, keep it as is. If you’re seeing more mirrors and MonoGreen, sub out 2 Reidaine for the full playset of portable holes – they are killer in creature matchups.

    • Bohe says:

      Portable Hole is great against aggro. Even Martin Juza plays 3 and just 2 Reidane. Using 2-4 main deck is always a good call.

      I prefer to keep the mainlist without dead cards in BO1. Holes do nothing against Izzet or Dimir, but beside that, the chance of drawing them against other aggresive strategies is enough reason to play the card. Is usually relevant enough to turn the game in our favor.

  4. Spencer says:

    Watch for Culling Ritual as a sweeper too. Seeing some play in mid-tier Golgari Decks and can be a huge blowout.

  5. Jason says:

    Nope, this deck sucks. If your opponent has any kind of removal you’re screwed. As always, their removal will be in their opening hand. There goes three of your first five turns…..and now your deck screwed. You can’t recover. Nothing in this deck works. You gotta get licky to get the cards you need AND get lucky that they don’t have ANY removal. Good luck with that. These weenie deckS that don’t ramp SUCK!! Thankful that I only wasted 5 wildcards on this terrible deck

    • Jason Dille says:

      If you don’t overwhelm them at the start you have no chance. There is no end game big pieces to finish the job. I don’t see how this wins at any more than 50-50. There is no combo that helps and very little synergy. Good luck getting the 4 one drops you need to make this work. I’ve played it 10 times and only got 2 one drops ONCE! So all rhat synergy with tge 2nd spell cast is basically useless. You’re always playing catch up. Not a fan

      • Bohe says:

        Oh, sorry, I didn’t realize that maybe both comments are from the same person, hehe.

        Getting only 2 one drops once sounds more like a lack of mulligans. 🤔

        The 2nd spell mechanics is just a part of the deck. Yes, play a turn 1 monk into Codespell Cleric + other monk is our best oppening, but… Play realy good creatures on curve like: Any one drop + Lumi Apprentice + Elite Spellbinder/Reidane could seal a lot of games on its own.

      • jasonmortimer says:

        I don’t even have my version complete yet and am currently running through Diamond. Maybe it changes in platinum or mythral but I play most of the top 4 tier decks there. Perhaps there decks are not quite complete but I live this deck. You have to play it right and you can mod it a lot.

    • Kalessin#33378 says:

      Man, that’s an unfair commentary.

      I’ve had my struggles with white weenies, but finally got my handle of them after some tweeking and got to mythic.

      Unlike many other comments in this post, I’ve ditched the learn/lesson package, kept the portable holes, added a few Mauls and, most importantly, replaced Clarion Spirit with Expedition Healer, which has overperformed for me.

      Give it another try or, at least, don’t be disrespectful to Bohe, man!

      • Bohe says:

        Hi, Kalessin!

        Congratulations on that Mythic! Adapting after all the information in this column means that, after reading all of it, you realize what works better for you, and that’s amazing!

        Btw, I’m going to try that Expedition Healer, sounds like a great idea!

      • jasonmortimer says:

        Steadfast Paladin is a 2 mana 2 2 card that always has lifelink. Is there a reason I’m not seeing why that wouldn’t be better to play. Also I used him the Paladin that is before I got some better cards and I don’t see how lifesteal is better then the 1 1 flying birds I always manage to trigger at least once

    • Bohe says:

      Hi, Jason. I climb to Mythic with this deck.

      I know that it could be hard some times when in a BO1 envioronment you get paired against high removal decks very often… But even then… Play this kind of decks is not just drop all your hand in the first 3 turns. Seeing your opponent’s first land should be enough to let us know if we have to play with more tempo.

      Against removal, having 2 or 3 threats should be enough to pressure our opponent. Play all our cards without any plan against a turn 3 Doomskar is surely an easy gg. Especially when we play against Dimir and their 3 wraths (Shadows Veredict, Crippling Fear, Blood on the Snow).

      If you have any questions about this deck and how to impprove with it, feel free to send me a pm on my social media links. I’ll will do my best trying to help you.

  6. Arquisto says:

    Recently got into MTG Arena from taking a long break in mtg paper. I saw a budget version of this last month and have been really enjoying it. Helped me get to Diamond 1 and i stopped there cause i didnt want to push it. This has been a great read and article and gave me even more insight as to white weenie decks in general. Thanks for the great write up and being so active in the comments too!

    • Bohe says:

      A pleasure, Arquisto! Ty so much for your kind comment. <3

      If you want to reach Mythic (with this or any other deck) being in Diamond 1 means that it's just matter of time, so, keep it up!

  7. Xabierum says:

    Thanks for this awesome article. I have run out of wildcards and have just one spellbinder and two legion angels. Do you guys any suggestions?

    • Bohe says:

      Hi, Xabierum.

      I think the best we could do is find replacements that fill the same space in the mana curve.

      If you got just two Legion Angel, I would still play 1 main and 1 side and just start adding the 3th and 4th ones when you have them. About Spellbinder, other good three mana creatures are: Archon of Emeria, Guardian of Faith, Sigrid, God-Favored, Selfless Glyphweaver , the 4th Reidane or even Priest of Ancient Lore if you don’t have any of the beforementioned cards. ^ -^

  8. Aldwinsanity says:

    Hi Bohe! Thanks for the article, I made this account just to make this comment LOL. I really want this deck to work because as a newer player, it’s the only meta deck that I can make right now haha.

    I’m really struggling to get out of Platinum with this deck, and I wonder what I’m doing wrong. Obviously, you won’t be able to tell me exactly what I’m doing wrong unless you watch a few of my games but maybe you can get an idea of how I play if I describe my games.

    The things that I struggle with are board wipes, endless removal, and games that go on for a long time, making an aggro deck grow weaker each turn especially against life gain, etc. My first theory is that it’s just the way I mulligan. Maybe, I don’t know the right plays that I should look for in the first turn. My second theory is me overplaying my hand, which I think I’ve gotten better at.

    Any thoughts? I know that wasn’t a lot of info but maybe you have an idea of why this isn’t working for a beginner.

    Thanks! 🙂

    • Bohe says:

      Hi, Aldwinsanity, and sorry of the delay…

      You are right about how mulligan correctly became extremly relevant with this deck. Mulligan aggresively trying to find a hand that curves well the first 3 turns of the game is vital for achieving sucess.

      The first turn should be:
      – Monk of the Open Hand is the default best turn 1.
      – Usher of the Fallen is our play if we don’t have a turn two play, because we can use the 2nd turn for making a token and use our mana efficiently.
      – Paladin Class is good as first turn play when we have a solid 2nd turn play like Luminarch Aspirant or Clarion Spirit. This has better results against decks with spot removal because we aim to take advantage of the tax effect. Saving the other one mana cards for future turns could give us powerful play if used properly.
      – Codespell Cleric is your last option for a turn 1 play, but is acceptable if you can curve out.

      Keeping a hand without one drops its acceptable is we have a good turn two play like Lumi Apprentice and a good third turn play like Elite Spellbinder.

      Overcommiting to the board is something that could make us drop many games against board swipes. The best way to fight against this is playing with tempo. That means to keep the preassure up with 2-3 creatures and save the rest for latter. Do this only when your attackers have a good 2 or 3 turn clock (like hitting for 6-7 dmg).

      But be careful. Go all in could give us many wins as well! If you have any more questions, feel free to send me a dm in any of my social media links. ^ -^