Four-Color Omnath Adventures Deck Guide

Omnath, Locus of Creation

Has there ever been a time in your life when you thought to yourself, “There’s no way I can lose now” or “This is so unfair” or “I can’t believe this is happening”? If so, which I think is everyone on planet Earth, then we have a deck for you! Not only does this deck evoke every emotion known to man from laughing to extreme confidence to utter misery and disappointment, but you will also end the day having more fun than you ever thought possible!

With the addition of Omnath, Locus of Creation to Throne of Eldraine’s most daunting deck, Temur Adventures, it is effectively left with no weaknesses (I will get into more detail on that later). Temur Adventures, prior to the rotation of one of Magic’s most powerful sets, War of the Spark, along with the rotation of amazing sets like Guilds of Ravnica and Ravnica Allegiance, was already one of the top decks to play! Surely, adding Omnath, Locus of Creation into the mix wouldn’t hinder this previously powerful deck. While there are some nuances and play patterns that are very different from those of the Temur Adventures decks of old, I truly believe that Omnath breaks new ground with this deck more than any innovation before it.

Now, it’s the moment we’ve all been waiting for. I’m Charizard_James, at the time of this article I am sitting at #34 on the Mythic ladder, and I present to you my deck guide for Four-Color Adventures featuring Omnath, Locus of Creation!

There are some variations of Adventures builds in the current Standard format, Temur or Four-Color, but most of them have the same general shell, and I will lay it out for you here:

In previous Standard formats, you can see what this basic shell looked like, and it’s not too different than the current builds, as you can see from this Top 8 deck list from Nathan Zamora at Grand Prix Portland back in 2019:

Now you’d think to yourself that this is just a deck full of high quality 2-for-1 adventure creatures and some card advantage with Escape to the Wilds and Edgewall Innkeeper, but the play patterns and deck matchups go much deeper than at first glance. When people see me play this deck on Twitch (you can find my Twitch link here), I often get asked questions like “How do you never run out of cards to play” and get told statements like “This deck just never runs out of gas.” The sheer power level of the adventure creatures is above average at best and mediocre at worst, but what really pushes the deck over the top is Lucky Clover – the silver bullet, the go-to right hand man, the level-up, the kicker, the dream team supreme. Lucky Clover combined with the adventure half of our creatures (along with the card advantage from Escape to the Wilds) is what really pushes this deck into contention for the best deck in the Standard format.

Since I have now gone over the building blocks and history of this deck, I want to go over the real reason why it is 100% the best deck, bar none, and it’s not even close. Omnath, Locus of Creation, combined with Escape to the Wilds and Fabled Passage is one of the most powerful plays in Standard outside of a huge Genesis Ultimatum, and I will detail the theory behind this – and every other card in the deck – right now in the deck breakdown!

Maindeck

4 Edgewall Innkeeper: This has been a mainstay staple of adventures decks since its inception, and for an undeniable reason – card advantage. This little 1 mana 1/1 isn’t anything to scoff at, as it can take over a game all by itself for hardly any cost. You’ve nearly already won the game when you trigger its ability multiple times in a turn, let alone having multiple Innkeepers on the board at once! I don’t even want to think about how many cards I’ve had to discard to hand size, it’s an embarrassing number. I find myself siding some number of this card out against aggressive strategies though, and I will explain more on the theory behind this in the Sideboard Guide of this article later.

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2 Giant Killer: Giant Killer is one of the best reasons to play 4 Colors instead of Temur Adventures. While Bonecrusher Giant can destroy creatures over 2 toughness if you have a Lucky Clover or 2 in play, creatures over 4 toughness are otherwise very difficult to remove from the battlefield outside of a timely Brazen Borrower, and Borrower is only a temporary answer to those cards. Lovestruck Beast, Yorvo, Stonecoil Serpent, Omnath, Kroxa, Kenrith, Terror of the Peaks, and Beanstalk Giant are all cards that present problems for the Temur version of this deck. Omnath is the most important creature to destroy when given the opportunity. Giant Killer is a clean answer for them all, and sometimes you get to destroy a bunch of them at the same time if there are Lucky Clovers involved. A must-include if you’re playing 4 Color Adventures.

4 Lucky Clover: Throughout this article, I’ve extolled the virtues of this card. On a scale of 1-10 it would be tipping the scale at 11. I would go as far as to say that this deck would not see any competitive play if it were not for this card. Not only does Lucky Clover double the adventure spells, but the copies don’t cost extra mana to cast! This lets the deck spiral out of control when Stomp deals 4-10 damage for lethal, when Petty Theft returns 2-5 creatures back to the opponent’s hand, or when Fertile Footsteps gets 2-5 more untapped mana sources! It goes without saying that you must include 4 copies of Lucky Clover in this deck.

3 Brazen Borrower: I originally had 4 in this deck, but with the increased number of mirror matches and Omnath Ramp decks on the Mythic ladder over the past week or so, I decided to trim to 3 due to the fact that they are the worst card in the deck in those matchups. Nothing feels worse than having to return a couple Lucky Clovers or Edgewall Innkeepers to the opponent’s hand, just to have them replay them again the next turn for minimal mana investment. Brazen Borrower is a powerhouse against most other matchups, so I would not go lower than 3.

4 Bonecrusher Giant: What else is there to say about Bonecrusher Giant? This card does everything! Need to destroy a small creature in an aggressive matchup? Check! Need to trade in combat with a Yorvo, Questing Beast, Omnath, or Gemrazer? Check! Need to destroy a planeswalker? Check! Need to pressure a control deck as a 4/3 attacker for only 3 mana? Check! Need to deal 8 damage to finish the opponent off after you’ve lost board position, and have a few Lucky Clovers in play? Check! In all seriousness, this card is a Swiss Army knife and Jack-of-all-Trades. Always play 4.

2 Lovestruck Beast: The Temur Adventure decks of old have always played 4 of this, due to its ability to swarm the board to create immense pressure in the early game against control decks while also controlling the battlefield on the ground against aggressive strategies. I am opting to cut to 2 of this card because Giant Killer fills a similar controlling role, while also providing the ability to destroy bigger creatures than Lovestruck Beast can handle – like a 12/12 Beanstalk Giant for example.

4 Beanstalk Giant: I like to call Beanstalk Giant the “unsung hero” of the 4 Color Adventures deck, and here’s why: it fills 4 different, important, and unrelated roles. Firstly, it does an amazing job at fixing the colors of mana in the early game. Nothing feels worse in a 4-color deck to have so many powerful spells in your hand and not be able to cast them. Secondly, this land also comes into play untapped, which is crucial in order to hold up a Mystical Dispute in the control matchups or to play out a second spell with the rest of your untapped mana sources. With Lucky Clover in play, this ramp is almost free, and is extremely valuable given the amount of mana this deck can consume in a single turn. Triggering Omnath Landfall is some nice additional upside. Thirdly, Beanstalk Giant is a huge, and I mean HUGE, late game threat. If the opponent cannot deal with this immense creature in the late game, they will most certainly lose. Mono Green and other creature-based decks have a very hard time dealing with a 10/10 Beanstalk Giant. Lastly, this creature facilitates the main win condition of 4 Color Adventures – Fling. I can just imagine putting a 16/16 Beanstalk Giant into a slingshot and flicking it at the opponent for lethal. All jokes aside, this is a legitimate win condition and is difficult to interact with. Happy flinging!

4 Fae of Wishes: As I have previously noted, flinging a gigantic Beanstalk Giant is the win condition, but there’s no Fling in the main deck. Thanks to Fae of Wishes, our combo piece comes out of the sideboard alongside numerous other situationally relevant cards, which I will explain further in the Sideboard Guide. Not only does Fae grant us the power of choice with an array of sideboard options, but a 1/4 for 2 mana is a very solid blocker against aggro decks. Also, Fabled Passage in the sideboard is one of my secret favorite things to grab with this card to facilitate 9 and 10 mana turn 5s, as you’ll see with the next card.

4 Omnath, Locus of Creation: If you thought Bonecrusher Giant was a Swiss Army knife, look no further than Omnath. We all know by now that Omnath is a powerful and versatile threat regardless of which deck it ends up in, but the adventures shell provides it new and unseen utility. Remember Fae of Wishes grabbing Fabled Passage from the sideboard? Omnath is the reason. If I have both Fae of Wishes and Omnath in hand, I often grab Fabled Passage on turn 4, especially if my hand consists of Escape to the Wilds already or if I have already played a Lucky Clover so I can grab Escape to the Wilds and Fabled Passage together. Turn 5 in this case goes like this: play Omnath, draw a card, play Fabled Passage, gain 4 life, fetch a basic land, gain 4 mana from Omnath, cast Escape to the Wilds with the remaining mana, then play another land from exile and pass the turn. What a turn! Every time I have completed this sequence, I have won the game and it was not even close. Go for this line of play given the opportunity, trust me.

3 Escape to the Wilds: This is our main way to create card advantage outside of Edgewall Innkeeper and the nature of adventure creatures themselves. Due to the 4 extra mana gained from Omnath and the extra land drop that Escape generates, it is very easy and sometimes trivial to play all the cards you exile. As a general rule of thumb, I’d recommend prioritizing playing the cards exiled with Escape from the Wilds before anything else, and you’ll almost never run out of cards to play if you do!

Sideboard

  • 1 Chainweb Aracnir: During my first day playing this deck, I found that Dimir Rogues was a tough matchup due to their great mix of flying threats, removal spells, and counterspells. Since they are likely milling a lot of cards from our deck and we want to exile our permanents from our own graveyard to play around Zareth San, Chainweb Aracnir is the card of choice to perform both roles.
  • 1 Soul-Guide Lantern: I didn’t originally have this card in the sideboard, but with the rise of graveyard-based Escape strategies like Grixis Control and Rakdos Escape, I recently chose to include it. Kroxa is a difficult card to manage for this deck, so appropriate actions must be taken. I think this card is always worth the inclusion as at least a 1-of.
  • 1 Negate: Sometimes we have to have an answer to Escape to the Wilds or Fling from a mirror match opponent, an Extinction Event, a Genesis Ultimatum, a Dance of the Manse, an Ashiok, or even our opponents’ counterspells in order to resolve our own threats. Negate is the most efficient and reliable way to do all of that, and Fae means we gain access to effectively four copies by including just one.
  • 2 Embereth Shieldbreaker: This adventure creature is not accessible with Fae of Wishes’ Granted spell, but it is worth the inclusion. Setting aside the fact that this card lets Edgewall Innkeeper draw a card, the mirror match can be a game of who has more Lucky Clovers, and this card does an amazing job at destroying those pesky artifacts. Imagine destroying 2 Lucky Clovers at the same time due to our own Lucky Clover copying it! Shieldbreaker is also useful in destroying Stonecoil Serpents, The Great Henge, and Embercleaves.
  • 1 Fling: Casting Fling sacrificing Beanstalk Giant is our main win condition. I prefer Fling over Kazuul’s Fury because we are already playing Fabled Passage in our sideboard if we desperately need to hit our land drops in a pinch. Fling is also 1 less mana than Kazuul’s Fury, which comes up more often than you’d think.
  • 2 Scorching Dragonfire: Dimir Rogues, Mono Green Stompy, and Mono Red Aggro can all present problems for this deck due to their very aggressive early game plan and our inability to keep up with that immense pressure in time to get Omnath going. Scorching Dragonfire deals with problem cards like Soaring Thought-Thief, Nighthawk Scavenger, Nessian Hornbeetle, Kazandu Mammoth, Anax Hardened in the Forge, Phoenix of Ash, Robber of the Rich, and even Ox of Agonas. These are a must-include.
  • 1 Thundering Rebuke: I’d like this card to be another copy of Scorching Dragonfire, but we need to have an answer to opposing Omnaths. Other creatures this card is great against are Yorvo, Questing Beast, Gemrazer, Torbran, and Terror of the Peaks. Worth noting, I’m choosing not to play Redcap Melee in my sideboard because I prefer Scorching Dragonfire’s versatility against non-red creatures, and I don’t ever want to sacrifice a land.
  • 1 Return to Nature: As I said earlier, the mirror match is often decided by who has the most Lucky Clovers on the battlefield. I do not want to be the player with less than my opponent. I’m choosing to play this card over Wilt because I value the graveyard exile against decks playing Kroxa and Ox of Agonas over the cycling ability.
  • 1 Mystical Dispute: I never leave this card in my sideboard after game 1 against any deck playing blue sources. By the time I need a Mystical Dispute, my opponent is very likely to be able to pay the 3 extra mana, so I opt to try to draw it instead of having to use Fae of Wishes to get it. In game 1, however, this is an awesome card to grab with Fae of Wishes to ensure you resolve a needed Escape to the Wilds or counter an Ashiok.
  • 1 Storm’s Wrath: I call this card my sideboard all-star. There have been many games, even in mirror matches, where I have just needed a sweeper regardless of my own board state. I have even preemptively added this card to my hand to discourage my opponents from committing more creatures to the board, only to do a completely different play on my turn. The mind games! This trusty card does the trick, and does it well.
  • 1 Once and Future: The combo reset button. If it doesn’t work, try it again! While Once and Future is very useful against counter-heavy decks, it can also grab a timely Bonecrusher Giant or Omnath that has been rotting in your graveyard for a few turns. Another must-include.
  • 1 Escape to the Wilds: Having access to 1 more Escape to the Wilds in the sideboard lets you effectively play 7 main deck Escapes due to Fae of Wishes. This card is one of the reasons I almost never run out of resources, hit extra land drops to facilitate Omnath’s other abilities, and also find the key Brazen Borrower, Giant Killer, or Bonecrusher Giant I need to seal the game.
  • 1 Fabled Passage: Most 4 Color Omnath Adventure deck lists have chosen to main deck all 4 copies of Fabled Passage, so I consider this my own personal spin on the archetype. Playing the 4thFabled Passage in the sideboard has won me numerous games due to Fae of Wishes having the ability to grab Fabled Passage out of the sideboard when I already have Omnath in hand. It does nothing but make my turn 5 create 10 mana more consistently. Who wouldn’t want to do that?

Sideboard Guide

I agree with the theory behind sideboard guides that Robert Lee, fellow MTG Arena Zone content creator, has presented in the past: “I’m not the biggest fan of definitive sideboard guides as they can placate your ability for on-the-fly decision-making, but knowing how I approach each matchup is obviously extremely helpful.”

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Four-Color Adventures Mirror

InOut
1 Mystical Dispute
2 Embereth Shieldbreaker
3 Brazen Borrower

Four-Color Omnath Ramp (no Ruin Crab)

InOut
1 Mystical Dispute1 Brazen Borrower

Four-Color Omnath Ramp (with Ruin Crab)

1 Mystical Dispute
2 Scorching Dragonfire
3 Brazen Borrower

Dimir Rogues

InOut
1 Chainweb Aracnir
1 Mystical Dispute
2 Scorching Dragonfire
1 Thundering Rebuke
1 Edgewall Innkeeper
1 Giant Killer
2 Lovestruck Beast
1 Escape to the Wilds

Mono Green Stompy

InOut
2 Scorching Dragonfire
1 Thundering Rebuke
1 Storm’s Wrath
2 Embereth Shieldbreaker
2 Edgewall Innkeeper
2 Fae of Wishes
1 Beanstalk Giant
1 Escape to the Wilds

Mono Red Aggro

InOut
2 Scorching Dragonfire
1 Thundering Rebuke
1 Storm’s Wrath
1 Embereth Shieldbreaker
2 Edgewall Innkeeper
2 Giant Killer
1 Escape to the Wilds

Rakdos Escape Midrange

InOut
1 Scorching Dragonfire
1 Chainweb Aracnir
2 Lovestruck Beast

Control

InOut
1 Mystical Dispute
1 Chainweb Aracnir
2 Giant Killer

I hope you enjoyed your read and thank you for your time! It has been a great privilege to have the opportunity to publish a deck guide for one of my favorite decks of all time, Four-Color Adventures. If you want to watch me play this deck alongside many others (maybe even those of your choosing), please follow me on Twitch!

1 Response

  1. Fitzcairn_ Fitzcairn_ says:

    Hello, thanks for the guide ! I’m just starting to understand and handle the deck, better late than never ahah. I’m wondering why you don’t play Ugin the sideboard because every Omnath 4C decks i seen play one or two on main or in side. Could you explain your point of view ? Thanks ! 🙂

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